earth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Japan

 

1872-1953 | 1969-2004

 

2 Yen, (1872)

2 yen (1872) front
2 yen (1872) back
Courtesy Lyn Knight

 

1 Yen, (1916)
Convertible Silver Note Issue

1 Yen, (1916) front
1 Yen, (1916) back

Enlarge: Front1 Yen, (1916) front
 & Back1 Yen, (1916) back

Front: Takeuchi no Sukune, a legendary grand minister during the reign of Empress Jingu (169-269 AD)

Back: Promise to Pay One Yen in Silver

 

5 Yen, (1930)

5 yen (1930) front
5 yen (1930) back

Enlarge: Front5 yen (1930) front
 & Back5 yen (1930) back

Front: Sugawara Michizane (845-903), Japanese political figure and scholar

Back: 5 Yen

 

10 Yen, (1930)

10 yen (1930) front
10 yen (1930) back

Enlarge: Front10 yen (1930) front
 & Back10 yen (1930) back

Front: Wake no Kiyomaro (733-799), a high-ranking Japanese official during the Nara period

Back: Gooh Shrine

 

10 Yen, (1945), U. S. Propaganda Note

10 yen 1945 front
10 yen 1945 back

Enlarge: Front10 yen 1945 front
 & Back10 yen 1945 back

In the summer of 1945, Japan was showered almost daily by aerial leaflets in such quantity that the Japanese people developed a kind of apathy against them. A novel approach had therefore to be sought to attract renewed attention. The ingenious idea was to reproduce the face side of the then current 10-yen banknote and replace the back by a propaganda message. For who could resist money falling from the sky?

There are four different propaganda leaflets. All have the same exquisitely lithographed front to resemble closely the genuine Japan 10 Yen 1930 banknote but with different messages on the back.

One striking difference between the genuine bills and the counterfeit is that the former has red seal on the front whereas the latter has brown seal. The other difference is that all counterfeit bills bear the serial number 450941 and the block number 1124 on the front.

The purpose of the leaflets was to stir Japanese resentment against their government and to create fear of inflation.

Translation of the text:

In 1930, when the Gumbatsu (militarists) had not yet started the war in China, you could buy the following items for 10 yen:
* 25 sho (about 20 Kg) of good rice.
* Or material for 8 summer kimonos.
* Or 4 bags (50 Kg packages) of charcoal.

In 1937, after the start of the China Incident, you could buy the following for 10 yen:
* 25 sho of low grade rice.
* Or material for 5 summer kimonos.
* Or 2 bags of charcoal.

Today, after waging three years of hopeless warfare with the world's greatest powers, you can buy the following with 10 yen:
* 1/2 sho of good rice in the black market.
* Or a small amount of charcoal, if you can get it.
* Cotton material, nothing.

This is what your leaders call co-prosperity.

 

Message 2

Message 2

Enlarge: Message 2Message 2

Translation of the text:

5000 Yen

The Gumbatsu is wasting your tax money.
For this war the Gumbatsu has spent the equivalent of 5,000 yen for every Japanese.
Think what you could have done with that.
Every day the war continues more of your money is being wasted.

 

Message 3

Message 3

Enlarge: Message 3Message 3

Translation of the text:

Factory Workers

You have made much money up to now, but what good is it?
You can buy little more with it than you can with this 10 yen.

Those who devote their total energies to war production are the same as soldiers.
You are soldiers of production. But, do you get plenty of beer and rice?
Do you receive specially distributed goods such as soldiers and their families receive?

 

Message 4

Message 4

Enlarge: Message 4Message 4

Translation of the text:

Fellow Japanese

What good is money in the bank or in bonds?
Buy what you need now and will need in the future, because goods ae becoming scarce.
As a result of the bombing by America, many stores will be closed.
Buy food, clothing and other daily necessities to tie you over these periods.

Money will not be satisfy your hunger or clothe you.
Bonds will not satisfy a baby's cry.
A wise person would buy now, not save his money.
The present is not a time for saving money.
It's a time to buy goods.

 

5 Yen, (1943)

5 yen (1943) front
5 yen (1943) back

Enlarge: Front5 yen (1943) front
 & Back5 yen (1943) back

Front: Sugawara Michizane (845-903), Japanese political figure and scholar

Back: 5 Yen

 

1 Yen, (1944-45)

1 yen (1944-45) front
1 yen (1944-45) back

Enlarge: Front1 yen (1944-45) front
 & Back1 yen (1944-45) back

Front: Takeuchi no Sukune, a legendary grand minister during the reign of Empress Jingu (169-269 AD)

Back: Ube Shrine

 

5 Yen, (1944)

5 yen (1944) front
5 yen (1944) back

Enlarge: Front5 yen (1944) front
 & Back5 yen (1944) back

Front: Sugawara Michizane (845-903), Japanese political figure and scholar

Back: 5 Yen

 

10 Yen, (1944)

10 yen (1944) front
10 yen (1944) back

Enlarge: Front10 yen (1944) front
 & Back10 yen (1944) back

Front: Wake no Kiyomaro (733-799), a high-ranking Japanese official during the Nara period

Back: Go'oh Jinja Shrine

 

50 Sen, 1938

50 sen 1938 front
50 sen 1938 back

Enlarge: Front50 sen 1938 front
 & Back50 sen 1938 back

 

50 Sen, 1944

50 sen 1944 front
50 sen 1944 back

Enlarge: Front50 sen 1944 front
 & Back50 sen 1944 back

 

50 Sen, 1948

50 sen 1948 front
50 sen 1948 back

Enlarge: Front50 sen 1948 front
 & Back50 sen 1948 back

Front: Itagaki Taisuke (1837-1919), Japanese statesman

Taisuke was born in Tosa, Japan into a samurai family. In the 1860s he became a military leader of the Tosa district, and participated in the Meiji Restoration. He served sporadically in the new government. Seeking greater democracy, Taisuke founded Japan's first political party, the Liberal Party, in 1881.

Back: National Diet building

 

10 Sen, 1945
Allied Military Currency - WWII

10 sen 1945 front
10 sen 1945 back

Enlarge: Front10 sen 1945 front
 & Back10 sen 1945 back

 

10 Yen, 1945

10 yen 1945 front
10 yen 1945 back

Enlarge: Front10 yen 1945 front
 & Back10 yen 1945 back

Front: Wakeno Kiyomaro (733-799)

Back: Go'oh Jinja Shrine

 

1 Yen, 1946

1 yen 1946 front
1 yen 1946 back

Enlarge: Front1 yen 1946 front
 & Back1 yen 1946 back

Front: Ninomiya Sontoku (1787-1856), Japanese agricultural leader

Back: 1 Yen

 

10 Yen, 1946

10 yen 1946 front
10 yen 1946 back

Enlarge: Front10 yen 1946 front
 & Back10 yen 1946 back

 

100 Yen, 1953

100 yen 1953 front
100 yen 1953 back

Enlarge: Front100 yen 1953 front
 & Back100 yen 1953 back

Front: Itagaki Taisuke (1837-1919), Japanese statesman

Back: National Diet building

 

National Diet building

National Diet building

Enlarge: BuildingNational Diet building

1872-1953 | 1969-2004

Back to Asia

Japan, situated off the east coast of asia, abolished Shogunate and established a parliamentary form of government in the 1850's. Became a constitutional monarchy after WWII. For a more detailed country profile, see CIA World Factbook on Japan.

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

Valid HTML 4.01! star Explanation of Level Triple-A Conformance star Valid CSS!

This site best viewed at display resolution 1024 x 768 or higher
Copyright 2015 Tom Chao ~ All Rights Reserved