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Zimbabwe Hyperinflation Banknotes

 

2008 | 2009

 

 

20,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009)

$20,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009) Front
$20,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009) Back

Enlarge: Front$20,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 front
 & Back$20,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 back

Courtesy noteshobby

 

50,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009)

$50,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009) Front
$50,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009)

Enlarge: Front$50,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009) front
 & Back$50,000,000,000 Dollars 2008 (2009) back

 

This kid is a Billionaire

this kid is a billionaire

 

10 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009)

10 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Front
10 Trillion Dollars 2009 (issued 2009) Back

Enlarge: Front10 Trillion Dollars Back 2009 (issued 2009) front
 & Back10 Trillion Dollars Back 2009 (issued 2009) back

 

20 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009)

20 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Front
20 Trillion Dollars 2009 (issued 2009) Back

Enlarge: Front20 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) front
 & Back20 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) back

 

50 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009)

50 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Front
50 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Back

Enlarge: Front50 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) front
 & Back50 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) back

 

100 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009)

100 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Front
100 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) Back

Enlarge: Front100 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) front
 & Back100 Trillion Dollars 2008 (issued 2009) back

This note has an unusual serial number 4740474. It is known as a radar note, one that reads the same forward and backward.

 

Tip for the Waiter?

tip for the waiter?

2008 | 2009

Back to Hyperinflation Banknotes

Zimbabwe is in a period of hyperinflation. At the time of independence in 1980, one Zimbabwean dollar was worth US$1.50. Since then, rampant inflation and the collapse of the economy have severely devalued the currency.

In the August 2006 currency reform, 1 new dollar was exchanged for 1,000 old dollars. The highest denomination was then 1000 new dollars.

Due to continued runaway inflation, the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe released into circulation on December 20, 2007 three high denomination bearer checks, $250,000, $500,000 and $750,000.

On January 1, 2008, the bank released, for the first time, million dollar bearer checks, $1,000,000, $5,000,000 and $10,000,000.

On April 4, 2008, the bank introduced $25,000,000 and $50,000,000 bearer checks.

On May 6, 2008, the bank put into circulation $100,000,000 and $250,000,000 bearer checks.

On May 15, 2008, the bank introduced a new $500 million bearer check, and special agricultural checks in $5 billion, $25 billion and $50 billion denominations for farmers.

On July 19, 2008, the bank released a new $100 billion agro check. The new note is equal to just one U.S. dollar. With inflation running officially at 2.2 million per cent (actual rate closer to 12.5 million per cent), $100 billion can not even buy a loaf of bread. It can only buy four oranges.

On August 1, 2008, Zimbabwe issued new bank notes, knocking 10 zeros off the dollar and revalued a 10 billion dollar note to equal one zimdollar.

Currency revaluation did not slow down hyperinflation. The highest denomination of the revalued currency jumped to $100 trillion by January 2009.

On February 2, 2009, the bank announced dropping 12 zeros in another currency revaluation: 1 trillion dollars for 1 new dollar.

In April, 2009 Zimbabwe suspended the use of the Zimbabwe dollar for at least a year following the legalization of foreign currencies (most notably the United States dollar and South African rand).

 

 

 

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